Summer Knowledge Challenge 2014

This year, I read Justice for Hedgehogs[^aff] by Ronald Dworkin. In philosophy, ethics was always my favorite topic. In fact, I always was into most of the topics of practical philosophy. I heard about the book a few times already and I thought it'd be great to extract knowledge from a contemporary author's work for my Zettelkasten. Also, people said Dworkin is kind of resurrecting a Socratic take on morality, so I was intrigued from the start.

These are the posts so far in chronological order:

Still want to join? Tell me about your book of choice and add a link to your blog so I can mention you here!

[^aff]: Affiliate links; I get a small kickback from the vendor if you buy from my link but it won't cost you anything.

Challenge: Apply the Knowledge Cycle to Reading a Single Book

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I plan to write a long term paper at University later this year. It's going to be about the book Justice for Hedgehogs[^aff] by Ronald Dworkin, and I'll be able to mostly work with this single source exclusively. Consequently, there won't be much additional research. How does the Knowledge Cycle apply if you read a book and don't do research? I invite you to take the "Summer Knowledge Challenge" and find out with me.

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Use a Short Knowledge Cycle to Keep Your Cool

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It's important to manage working time. Managing to-do lists is just one part of the equation to getting things done when it comes to immersive creative work where we need to make progress for a long time to complete the project. To ensure we make steady progress, we need to stay on track and handle interruptions and breaks well. A short Knowledge Cycle will help to get a full slice of work done multiple times a day, from research to writing. This will help staying afloat and not drown in tasks.

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The Collector’s Fallacy

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There’s a tendency in all of us to gather useful stuff and feel good about it. To collect is a reward in itself. As knowledge workers, we’re inclined to look for the next groundbreaking thought, for intellectual stimulation: we pile up promising books and articles, and we store half the internet as bookmarks, just so we get the feeling of being on the cutting edge.

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